Friday, May 13, 2011


(NOTE:  re-posted from May 13 due to technical difficulties)

It's amazing how far we've come with regard to information accessibility on the internet.  All the cool stuff available at the click of a mouse is phenomenal.  It's educational and enlightening, motivating and inspirational.  But, at times, can it feel like just T.M.I. (too much information)?  I mean this in a mostly positive way-not complaining at all.

Here's what I mean:  in just one morning I read a post from RadioInk on "Today's Hottest WiFi Radio Devices", how "Traditional Radio Matters" at Digital Music News,'s "How The iPad Is Transforming Retail Sales", a Mashable story on how "Five Ways Social Media Has Changed Marketing Campaigns", a study on "Are There Bullies At Your Workplace" at OpenForum and Mark Ramsey's "Think of Your Digital Platform as a Relationship Engine".  There was an outstanding piece from Jacobs Media on "The L Word" (and, it had at least ten embedded links, all to other great stuff). 

And, just for fun, the breaking news on Ashton Kutcher joining "Two And A Half Men",  Ken Levine's blog post, "Confessions Of A Pathetic TV Addict", Jon Stewart's latest bit of brilliance and the stash of porn found at Bin Laden's compound.  Oh, almost forgot the 66 new emails, messages/status updates on Facebook and ordering my dogs' heartworm medication online.  This doesn't include any actual pleasure reading, either. 

Starting to sound familiar?

It's often said we only use ten percent of our brainpower ( about it here) but when we consider our thirst for knowledge and basic human curiosity on top of our daily routine (job, family, church, honey-do, maybe a little sleep), it's understandable that sometimes our heads feel like they'll just freeze up (like your computer or PDA does when trying to absorb all this information).  But, I love it- it's exciting, challenging, I enjoy the ever-increasing flow of information and like to think I'm learning something new every day.

So, what's the answer here?  How do we balance the wondrous and ever-increasing access to information/entertainment and just plain life?  If I could solve that one, bottle and sell it, I'd have beaten out Microsoft over buying Skype.  For now, I'm logging off, leaving my cell phone on the charger and going out to the peace and solitude of mowing my lawn.
"Hire JJ Duling!" Facebook page